Interview with author Greg Morgan

Q1. Hello Sir, can you please introduce yourself? Readers would love to know more about you.

Originally, I come from a screenwriter and independent filmmaking background with over twenty years of experience in the arts and entertainment industry. My directorial debut was entitled, 17 & Under, and won my first awards, garnered successful distribution and landed me squarely on the filmmaking map. Since then, I’ve been a part of many successful productions, with my latest film The Boatman. I won Best Director Idyllwild Film Festival among many other wins and a Best Director and Best Film nominee of the prestigious 33rd Annual Imagen Awards. Now I like to turn my storytelling skills into long-form narrative fiction. My first novel is entitled, Weeper. Weeper is the multigenerational story of the relationships between the members of two 19th century Appalachian families; the True’s, a family of “warners” (early funeral directors), and the Fenn’s, a family of “weepers” (paid mourners). My current is Collodion. It is the second in a companion series after Weeper. All three will submerge into the macabre world of the nineteenth century death industry; postmortem photography & embalming.

Q2. What were the key challenges you faced while writing ‘Weeper’ book?

My first novel was a huge learning curve. Adept at screenplays, novels posed a challenge. I learned from editors over and over again, with multiple versions. I got a little better with Collodion

Q3. What books or authors have most influenced your own writing?

Charles Frazier (Cold Mountain) Pat Conroy (Prince of Tides) I don’t even come close to the prose these guys produce, but they are an inspiration.

Q4. What’s your favourite spot to visit in your own country? And what makes it so special to you?

I’m a man of water. I love lakes, beaches, streams, rivers. I like visiting any place that has those.

Q5. Is there lots to do before you drive in and start writing a book?

Yes. I’m a plotter and plot out the entire story first. But I know it will change after many drafts. Something doesn’t work out, so you have to change it over here and so forth. Since I’m a historical fiction writer, research into history helps me bring in interesting facts and many times helps with plot.

Q6. How long did it take you to write ‘Collodion’ book?

About six months with many more months of revisions.

Q7. On what all platforms readers can find your books to buy?

Both of my books are on paperback, Kindle and Audible audiobook.

Q8. Tell us about the process of coming up with the cover and the title of your books?

I want something ironic or something that would make a reader say, “What is that?” The title of Collodion comes from the substance that is used both in wet plate photography and in embalming, the two professions of my two main characters. The cover for my second book is an interesting story: The two people on the cover I found in nineteenth century tintype photographs. They are real people that lived long ago. I bought them and used them on my cover of Collodion. I do not know who they are. Just regular people that lived long ago.

Q9. When writing a book how do you keep things fresh, for both your readers and also yourself?

I need a story I’ve never heard of before. I don’t want to write a story that is a different take on another story. That’s not my style.

Q10. Are there any secrets from the book (that aren’t in the blurb), you can share with your readers?

Many of the characters, places, ships and things in the story were true historical people, places, battles and things. In the kindle edition you can use their “X-ray” and click on their names and it gives a ton of interesting facts about the place or person or thing.

Author’s Profile

Book Is Available On Amazon

Collodion

Weeper

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